Bitte beachten Sie: Den Text in deutscher Sprache finden Sie weiter unten auf dieser Seite !

THE WORLD CHAMPIONSHIP

Nation-State, Globalization and Standardized Infrastructure in Grand Prix Racing

The map of the world of Grand Prix Racing shows a heavy concentration on Europe. That is no wonder, because Grand Prix is a European competition. The first Grand Epréuve had taken place on closed roads around the French town of Le Mans back in 1906. The circuit had been about 64 miles (102 kilometres) long and two heats of 12 laps each had been driven - no doubt Grand Epréuve is Great Trial in English language. By the way all Nation´s Grand Prix are meant by this term.

No question, the Automobile Club de France, founded in 1895, and, of course on the side of the rising car industry of their country, had really learnt their lessons from the mistakes made earlier. From 1900 on the Gordon Bennett Cup had taken place in Europe. Bennett had been the publisher of the New York Herald paper, a man of the media with enormous economical and political influence. But while the Americans had considered motor racing a competition between the nations, letting start only 3 cars of each country in their series of races, the A.C.F. had had a very different opinion. They had thought, car races are a competion between the automobile manufacturers. For this reason, the A.C.F permitted 3 cars per company for their Grand Prix, held as the reaction to the Gordon Bennett Cup. The same time the French organizers had done a pretty good job in the preparation of their track under the conditions of that time. A blood bath, that had happened both among the drivers and the spectators near the French town of Bordaux at the 1903 Paris - Madrid race should not have repeated.

We can see, that nation-state, the media (at that time the newspapers) and the on the European roads based infrastructure belong to the elements of Grand Prix Racing. That is no later proffessionalized amateur sports, like most other competitions in the world of sports, but fundamentally commercial, because no sports clubs, but rival companies competing on the international markets are taking part in it. For this reason Grand Prix Racing had been also a pure works-motorsport, because with a few exceptions, Grand Prix Cars cannot be bought, but must produced by the teams theirselves. When driving on especially prepared (and cleaned) roads, animals had been excluded from by using wooden barriers, the fenders, having got their origins in the age of the coaches, had been taken away, of course, for weight reasons. A little later, the mechanic onboard had been banned from the cockpits for exclusive work in the pit area, the single-seater racing car in it´s present shape had been born. Driving a racing car had switched from a trade to a fine art, only a few people in the world can master. At the beginning of the sixties the racing cars left out a step in the chassis evolution, when changing directly from the space frame to the monocoque: From the age of mail coaches to space age immidiatly, because the road cars´steel-made, load-bearing body, never had been experienced in Grand Prix Racing.

Let me here please explain shortly the differences between the European and the US-American motorsport. That one had, absolutely aware of it, it´s basis on closed circuits. NASCAR (National Association of Stock Car Automobile Racing) had been founded in the time of the Prohibition (1919 to 1933). While the in most cases youngster alcohol smugglers had done their illegal jobs during the nights, at daylight they had competed in races on public roads with their cars, having got production shapes, but also tweaked engines. The toll of lives had been too high, also in the world of gangsters, to be tolerated any longer. For this reason these guys were sent to the race tracks and made to obey certain sporting rules. The rate of accidents sank immidiately. CART (Championship Auto Racing Teams) and IRL (Indy Racing League) have got their roots on the horse racing courses. Later it had been paved with bricks (for that reason the Indianapolis oval is called Brickyard), before it was surfaced by asphalt.

France had not been alone in Europe with their Grand Prix. Already in 1907 Germany had organized the Deutschen Kaiserpreis. Each competition had got technical and sporting rules of it´s own, the so-called formula, but the further spread of Grand Prix Racing had been stopped by World War I (1914 - 1918). This armed quarrel brought a lot of material destruction to the European continent, but also an acceleration of technological development caused by the rise of military aviation, especially on the sector of high performance engines. In 1921 Italy organized the first foreign Grand Prix in history and Belgium, Germany and Monaco followed within a few years. Between both the world wars Grand Prix Racing experienced it´s first great boom. The rules were made similar and a European Racing Car Championship was established with the single Grand Prix of the different countries being it´s rounds. In spite of a hard challenge of Bugatti, Maserati and Alfa Romeo this period was dominated by the German makes of Mercedes-Benz and Auto Union. The German drivers Hans Stuck, Bernd Rosemeyer and Hermann Lang (each once) and Rudolf Caracciola (threetimes) won the European Championship in an uninterrupted row.

Protests, discussions about the right way interpreting the rules and disqualifications are existing since the first day of Grand Prix Racing. They are no invention of our time. And because communication is everything in Grand Prix Racing, the legendary Mercedes-Benz team manager Alfred Neubauer had established the pit signal already before World War II. In spite telemetry and radio being introduced during the eighties, the good old pit board is still update, "because you do not talk like in a café at the radio," knows Viennas most popular citizen Niki Lauda.

Since it´s very beginning Grand Prix Racing has developed a quasi-state organisation. The whole infrastructure, from the track to the pits, the medical centre and also the winner´s trophy is nearly identical formed by exact rules, in spite the races are taking place in nearly all cultural areas of the world. The time schedule of a Grand Prix is nearly identical in all countries and this competition is the only real worldchampionship held on all five continents, in spite of economic reasons partly making it always possible, doing it simultaniously. At a time, when the hypocritical amateur status had been dictated to many disciplines in sport by the International Olympic Committee (IOC), Grand Prix Racing had been the competition financed by sponsors for a long time. Since 1968 commercial sponsors, clearly visible, are allowed and television, since the same time broadcasting in colour, is giving them a worldwide platform. Since autumn 1985 the Grand Prix are transmitted in a global media system. As we can see, globalization had been taken place a lot earlier in Grand Prix Racing, then economics and politics had discovered that term.

Grand Prix is international and multi-cultural, sometimes big business, sometimes a technological odyssey, sometimes a very tough sport and sometimes also a lot of circus. The first one had been won by Ferencz Szisz from Hungary in a Renault from France back in 1906. In spite of internet and digital TV: It had not changed a lot during the last 100 years.

Klaus Ewald

 

Literature:

Anthony Pritchard
Historic Motor Racing
Weidenfeld and Nicholson, London
Without Year

Heinz Prueller
Die Story der deutschen Formel 1
Von Rosemeyer bis Schumacher
Alle Fahrer, alle Autos, alle Motoren
Verlag Orac, Wien-Muenchen-Zuerich
1996
ISBN 3-7015-0352-4

 

Internet:

Grand Prix History
Through The Lives Of It´s Great Drivers, Places & Events
By Dennis A. David

 

 

* * *

 

DIE WELT MEISTERSCHAFT

Nationalstaat, Globalisierung und genormte Infrastruktur im Grand Prix Sport

Die Weltkarte der Grand Prix Rennen zeigt eine starke Konzentration auf Europa. Das ist nicht weiter verwunderlich, da Grand Prix ein europäischer Wettbewerb ist. Der erste Grand Epréuve entstand 1906 auf den abgesperrten Landstrassen rund um die französische Stadt Le Mans. Der Kurs war rund 64 Meilen (102 Kilometer) lang und das Rennen ging über zwei Läufe von jeweils 12 Runden - Grand Epréuve heisst nicht umsonst auf Deutsch Grosse Prüfung. Mit diesem Begriff bezeichnet man heute übrigens alle Länder-Grand Prix.

Kein Zweifel, der Automobile Club de France, gegründet 1895 und selbstverständlich auf der Seite der aufstrebenden Fahrzeugindustrie seines Landes, hatte aus den Fehlern der vorausgegangen Jahre seine Lektion gründlich gelernt. Ab 1900 wurde in Europa der Gordon Bennett Cup gefahren. Bennett war der Verleger der Zeitung New York Herald, ein Medienmann von ernormen ökonomischen und politischem Einfluss. Doch während die Amerikaner den Automobilrennsport als Wettbewerb zwischen den Nationen betrachteten und folglich in ihrer Serie pro Rennen nur drei Autos je Land zuliessen, war der A.C.F. ganz anderer Meinung. Er verstand Autorennen als Wettbewerb zwischen den Autoherstellern. Für seinen als Reaktion auf den Gordon Bennett Cup ausgeschriebenen Grand Prix liess der A.C.F. folglich drei Autos pro Firma zu. Ausserdem preparierte der A.C.F. seinen Rundkurs für die Verhältnisse jener Zeit recht vorbildlich. Ein Blutbad, wie es beim Rennen Paris - Madrid 1903 nahe der französischen Stadt Bordaux gleichsam unter Fahrern und Zuschauern gegeben hatte, sollte sich nicht wiederholen.

Wir sehen also, dass der Nationalstaat, die Medien (damals die Zeitungen) und die auf den europäischen Landstrassen basierende Infrastruktur zu den Elementen des Grand Prix Sports gehört. Der ist keine später professionalisierte Amateursportart, wie fast alle anderen Wettbewerbe der Sportwelt, sondern von Grund auf kommerzialisiert, denn es konkurrierten von Anfang an keine Sportclubs, sondern auf den internationalen Märkten rivalisierende Wirtschaftsunternehmen. Grand Prix war daher von Anfang an auch ein reiner Werksrennsport, denn von einigen späteren Ausnahmen abgesehen, konnte man Grand Prix Rennwagen nicht kaufen, sondern musste sie selbst herstellen. Da man zwar auf Landstrassen fuhr, diese aber für das Rennen gesäubert wurden und Tiere durch Holzplanken von ihr ferngehalten wurden, konnte man bei den Rennwagen die noch von der Kutschen stammenden Kotflügel einfach weglassen, natürlich um Gewicht zu sparen. Als dann wenig später der mitfahrende Mechaniker an die Boxen verbannt wurde, wo Wartungs- und Reparaturarbeiten ausschliesslich stattfinden durften, war der Monoposto in seiner heutigen Form bereits geboren. Rennwagenfahren wurde vom Handwerk zur Kunst, die nur wenige auf der Welt beherrschen. Am Anfang der sechziger Jahre hat dieser Rennwagentyp dann eine Evolutionstufe im Fahrzeugbau ganz einfach ausgelassen, als der Rohrrahmen direkt durch das Monocoque ersetzt wurde: Vom Postkutschen- sofort in das Raumfahrtzeitalter, denn die selbsttragende Ganzstahlkarosserie wie bei serienmässig gefertigten Strassenautos hat es im Grand Prix Sport nie gegeben.

Lassen Sie mich hier kurz die Unterschiede zum US-Amerikanischen Motorsport aufzeigen. Dieser ist, ganz bewusst, auf geschlossenen Rennbahnen entstanden. NASCAR (National Association of Stock Car Automobile Racing) ist zur Zeiten der Prohibition (1919 bis 1933) entstanden. Während die meist jugendlichen Alkoholschmuggler in der Nacht mit äusserlich serienmässigen, aber mit frisierten Motoren ausgestatteten Autos ihrem illegalen Geschäft nachgingen, fuhren sie tagsüber damit Rennen auf öffentlichen Strassen. Der Blutzoll, der zu bezahlen war, war aber auch in der Welt der Gangster, kaum länger zu vertreten. Da schickte man sie auf die Rennbahn und unterwarf sie gewissen sportlichen Regeln. Die Zahl der Unfälle sank schlagartig. CART (Championship Auto Racing Teams) und IRL (Indy Racing League) entstanden auf dem Oval der Pferderennbahn. Später hat man es mit Ziegelsteinen gepflastert (daher: Brickyard), noch später mit einer Asphaltdecke versehen.

Frankreich war mit seinem Grand Prix nicht sehr lange alleine in Europa geblieben. Schon 1907 veranstaltete Deutschland den Deutschen Kaiserpreis. Jeder Wettbewerb hatte schon sein eigenes Reglement, die sogenannte Formel, doch der weiteren Ausbreitung des Grand Prix Sports stand von 1914 bis 1918 der Erste Weltkrieg entgegen. Der Waffengang hinterliess zwar grosse Zerstörungen in Europa, er brachte aus der Militärluftfahrt jedoch einen enormen technologischen Aufschwung mit sich, und dies in allen Bereichen, nicht nur, aber eben am meisten sichtbar auf dem Sektor des Hochleistungs-Motorenbaus. 1921 veranstaltete Italien als erstes Drittland einen Grand Prix; Belgien, Deutschland und Monaco folgten binnen weniger Jahre. Zwischen den beiden Weltkriegen erlebte der Grand Prix Sport einen ersten grossen Boom. Die Formeln wurden einander angeglichen und es entstand eine Europameisterschaft, deren einzelne Läufe die Grand Prix der einzelnen Länder bildeten. Diese Phase wurde trotz harter Konkurrenz von Bugatti, Maserati und Alfa Romeo von den deutschen Marken Mercedes-Benz und Auto Union dominiert. Die deutschen Fahrer Hans Stuck, Bernd Rosemeyer und Hermann Lang (jeweils einmal) und Rudolf Caracciola (dreimal) gewannen in den Jahren 1934 bis 1939 die Europameisterschaft in ununterbrochener Reihenfolge.

Proteste, Diskussionen um die Reglementsauslegung und Disqualifikationen hatte es seit den ersten Tagen des Grand Prix gegeben. Sie sind also keine Erfindung der Neuzeit. Und da Kommunikation im Grand Prix Sport bekanntlich alles ist, hatte der legendäre Mercedes-Rennleiter Alfred Neubauer noch vor dem Zweiten Weltkrieg die Boxensignale eingeführt. Obwohl in den achtziger Jahren Telemetrie und Sprechfunk installiert wurden, haben sie die gute alte Boxentafel bis heute nicht abgelöst, "denn am Funk redet man nicht wie in einem Caféhaus," weiss Wiens berühmtester Bürger Niki Lauda.

Der Grand Prix Sport hat sich seit Anfang der siebziger Jahre eine quasi-staatliche Organisation geschaffen. Die gesamte Infrastruktur, von der Strecke über die Boxen und das Medical Centre bis hin zum Siegerpokal sind weitestgehend genormt, obwohl die Läufe zur Weltmeisterschaft in fast allen Kulturkreisen dieser Erde ausgetragen werden. Der Veranstaltungsablauf eines Grand Prix ist in allen Ländern gleich und der Wettbewerb ist wirklich die einzige Weltmeisterschaft die auf allen fünf Kontinenten ausgetragen wird, wenngleich ökonomische Notwendigkeiten dies nicht immer zeitgleich zuliessen. Zu einer Zeit, als vielen Sportarten vom Internationalen Olympischen Komitee (IOC) noch der heuchlerische Amateurstatus diktiert wurde, war der Grand Prix Sport diejenige Konkurrenz, die längst als erstes durch Sponsoren finanziert wurde, ab 1968 wurden, deutlich sichtbar, sogar branchenfremde Firmen zugelassen. Seit dieser Zeit verschafft ihnen das Fernsehen, von da an erstmals auch in Farbe, eine weltweite Öffentlichkeit. Und in einem globalen Medienverbund werden die Rennen seit Herbst 1985 übertragen. Globalisierung hat hier schon stattgefunden, lange bevor dieser Begriff von Wirtschaft und Politik überhaupt entdeckt wurde.

Grand Prix ist international und multi-kulturell, mal das grosses Geschäft, mal technologische Odyssee, mal harter Sport, manchmal aber auch ganz viel Zirkus. Den ersten hat 1906 Frencz Szisz aus Ungarn mit einem Renault aus Frankreich gewonnen. Trotz Internet und Digital-Fernsehen: Viel hat sich in 100 Jahren eigentlich nicht geändert.

Klaus Ewald

 

Literatur:

Anthony Pritchard
Rennwagen und Autorennen
Ariel Verlag, Frankfurt/Main und Parkland Verlag Stuttgart
Ohne Jahrgang

Heinz Prüller
Die Story der deutschen Formel 1
Von Rosemeyer bis Schumacher
Alle Fahrer, alle Autos, alle Motoren
Verlag Orac, Wien-München-Zürich
1996
ISBN 3-7015-0352-4

 

Internet:

Grand Prix History
Through The Lives Of It´s Great Drivers, Places & Events
By Dennis A. David

 

 

 

graphics by project * 2000

 

 

© 2002 by researchracing

 

l Home l