Bitte beachten Sie: Den Text in deutscher Sprache finden Sie weiter unten auf dieser Seite !

FERRARI IN FORMULA 1 - FROM 1948 TO 2003

Unique presentation relating to Ferrari's Formula-1 history - more than 20 racers from the last 55 years which, until now, have driven to 24 World-Championship titles and over 160 Grand-Prix victories in total

Formula 1 - that is the myth in automobile racing. Ferrari - that is the myth in Formula 1. Since the beginning of the Formula-1 World Championship in 1950, Ferrari has competed in this most important championship without interruption - the only team to do so at all. The crimson Formula-1 racers from Maranello have exerted a decisive influence on the history of the World Championship. Ferrari is the most successful team ever. Time and again, there have been highs and lows. For example, Ferrari had to wait from 1979 to 2000 before it was once again able to provide a World-Champion driver. His name: Michael Schumacher.

This year, it will be possible to see more than 20 Ferrari Grand-Prix racers in Essen in a unique special presentation. They will offer an insight into the development of the Formula-1 sport. Starting with the type 125 from 1948 (still before the introduction of the World Championship) right up to the current F2003. There has never been such an extensive and top-class collection of Ferrari's Formula-1 cars at a public fair.

The Ferrari Records in the World Championship
(Status: September 14, 2003 after the Italian Grand Prix)

12 Drivers' Titles (2nd Place: McLaren with 11)
1952 and 1953: Alberto Ascari (Italy) - at that time, staged with Formula-2 cars
1956: Juan Manuel Fangio (Argentina)
1958: Mike Hawthorn (England)
1961: Phil Hill (USA)
1964: John Surtees (England)
1975 and 1977: Niki Lauda (Austria)
1979: Jody Scheckter (South Africa)
2000 to 2002: Michael Schumacher (Germany)

12 Constructors' Titles (2nd Place: Williams with 9)
1961, 1964, 1975 to 1977, 1979, 1982, 1983 and 1999 to 2003.
Note: The constructors' title has existed officially since 1958. Ferrari won it "unofficially" in 1952, 1953 and 1956 as well.


165 Victories in World-Championship Races (2nd Place: McLaren with 137)
165 Pole Positions (2nd Place: Williams with 123)
166 Fastest Laps (2nd Place: Williams with 126)

The company founder Enzo Ferrari (born on February 18, 1898) died on August 14, 1988 at the age of 90 in his house in Modena. From 1919 to 1932, he was an active racing driver but without being able to notch up any really great success. In 1929, he founded the Scuderia Ferrari which became the official racing team of Alfa Romeo in the 30s. Drivers such as Tazio Nuvolari, Achille Varzi or Louis Chiron won the Mille Miglia Race, the 24-Hour Race in Le Mans, the Belgian Grand Prix or the German Grand Prix at the Nürburgring.

However, in the period from 1933 to 1939, they had hardly any chance against the Mercedes and Auto Union racing cars in the Grand-Prix sport. In 1939, he acrimoniously split from Alfa Romeo and began to construct his own cars - of course, racing cars. In 1940 (Italy had not yet entered the Second World War which started on September 1, 1939), two Ferrari sports cars competed in the Mille Miglia Race but, for contractual reasons ("separation contract" with Alfa Romeo), were called ANSA.

After the end of the Second World War, the first sports-car race contested by a "genuine" Ferrari took place in Piacenza (Italy) on May 11, 1947. The car driven by Franco Cortese (Italy) dropped out.

Since 1948, Ferrari has participated not only in sports-car races but also in Formula 1. It began by building sporty production cars which, because of the many racing successes of its company (e.g. in 1949, its first overall victory in Le Mans as well as Grand-Prix wins in Switzerland and Italy), quickly became a status symbol of crowned heads and film stars.

In 1952, a Ferrari driver (Alberto Ascari) won the Drivers' World Championship for the first time. Until today, this has been followed by eleven more titles. In 1953, there was the first title in the World Sports-Car Championship for Ferrari. Up to 1973, Ferrari was able to chalk up 13 additional titles in this category. What has been almost forgotten nowadays: With its team, Ferrari was also involved in Formula-2 races and in races for the European Mountain Championship in the 60s and 70s.

Since 1974, Ferrari's automobile sport has concentrated exclusively on Formula 1. Today, Ferrari belongs to the Fiat group.


03A001.jpg

Ferrari Tipo 125 (1948 and 1949)

The first Formula-1 racing car with the name Ferrari.
Capacity: 1500 ccm with a supercharger, twelve cylinders, power: 230 hp and weight: 700 kg.
Victories in 1949: Swiss Grand Prix in Bern-Bremgarten and Italian Grand Prix in Monza (driver in each case: Alberto Ascari from Italy).


03A002.jpg

Ferrari Tipo 375 (1951)

In the second year of the Formula-1 World Championship, Ferrari trod a new path. Instead of the 1.5-litre engine with a supercharger, it used a racer with a 4.5-litre naturally aspirated engine (at that time, the rules allowed both variants). In 1951, the Tipo 375 won the very first race in the Formula-1 World Championship for Ferrari - in Silverstone.
Capacity: 4500 ccm, twelve cylinders, power: 360 hp and weight: 850 kg.
Victories in 1951: English Grand Prix in Silverstone (driver: Jose Froilan Gonzalez from Argentina) as well as German Grand Prix at the Nürburgring and Italian Grand Prix in Monza (driver in each case: Alberto Ascari from Italy).
The Ferrari driver Alberto Ascari was the runner-up in the World Championship.


03A003.jpg

Ferrari Tipo 625 (1954 and 1955)

In 1954 and 1955, the competition had hardly any chance against Mercedes-Benz. In these two years, Ferrari used three different types. The most successful was the Tipo 625.
Capacity: 2500 ccm, four cylinders, power: 250 hp and weight: 600 kg.
Victory in 1954: English Grand Prix in Silverstone (driver: Jose Froilan Gonzalez from Argentina).
Victory in 1955: Monaco Grand Prix (driver: Maurice Trintignant from France).
The Ferrari driver Jose Froilan Gonzalez was the runner-up in the World Championship in 1954.


03A004

Ferrari Tipo 555 Superqualo (1954 and 1955)

At that time, the distinctive characteristics were the side tanks which gave the car a wide appearance.
Capacity: 2500 ccm, four cylinders, power: 250 hp and weight: 600 kg.
Victory in 1954: Spanish Grand Prix in Barcelona (driver: Mike Hawthorn from England).


03A005.jpg

Ferrari-Lancia D50 (1956 and 1957)

When Lancia withdrew from Formula 1 in the middle of 1955, the company handed over all its Formula-1 material to Ferrari. There, the car was refined and won the World Championship in 1956 with Juan Manuel Fangio as the driver.
Capacity: 2500 ccm, eight cylinders, power: 285 hp and weight: 650 kg.
Victories in 1956: Argentinian Grand Prix in Buenos Aires (*drivers: Juan Manuel Fangio / Luigi Musso), Belgian Grand Prix in Spa and French Grand Prix in Reims (driver in each case: Peter Collins from England) as well as English Grand Prix in Silverstone and German Grand Prix at the Nürburgring (driver in each case: Juan Manuel Fangio from Argentina).
* = driver changes during the race were permitted at that time.

03A006.jpg

Ferrari Tipo 246 Dino (1958 to 1960)

The Ferrari 246 Dino (named after Ferrari's son who had died in 1956) was the last Formula-1 racing car with a front-located engine to win a race in the Formula-1 World Championship - in Monza (Italy) in 1960.
Capacity: 2500 ccm, six cylinders, power: 280 hp and weight: 560 kg.
Victories in 1958: French Grand Prix in Reims (driver: Mike Hawthorn from England) as well as English Grand Prix in Silverstone (driver: Peter Collins from England).
Victories in 1959: French Grand Prix in Reims and German Grand Prix at Avus (driver in each case: Tony Brooks from England).
Victory in 1960: Italian Grand Prix in Monza (driver: Phil Hill from the USA).
The Ferrari driver Mike Hawthorn was the World Champion in 1958 with the 246 and Tony Brooks was the runner-up in the World Championship in 1959.


03A007.jpg

Ferrari Tipo 156 (1961 to 1963)

From 1961 to 1965, a capacity limit of 1500 ccm was in force in Formula 1 (from 1954 to 1960, it had been 2500 ccm). Ferrari won the World-Championship title with Phil Hill in 1961 but lost its driver Graf Berghe von Trips who was killed in an accident in Monza. In the next two years, the outcome was meagre (only one Grand-Prix victory). No more originals of the 156 exist. Ferrari made sure that they were all destroyed. However, the pop singer Chris Rea had a reproduction fabricated.
Capacity: 1500 ccm, six cylinders, power: 200 hp and weight: 470 kg.
Victories in 1961: Dutch Grand Prix in Zandvoort and the English Grand Prix in Aintree (driver in each case: Graf Berghe von Trips from Germany), Belgian Grand Prix in Spa and Italian Grand Prix in Monza (driver in each case: Phil Hill from the USA) as well as French Grand Prix in Reims (driver: Giancarlo Baghetti from Italy).
Victory in 1963: German Grand Prix at the Nürburgring (driver: John Surtees from England).


03A008.jpg

Ferrari Tipo 312 (1966 to 1969)

As from 1966, new rules were in force in Formula 1. The maximum capacities were 3000 ccm for cars with a naturally aspirated engine and 1500 ccm for vehicles with supercharging. Ferrari developed the Tipo 312 for the new Formula 1.
Capacity: 3000 ccm, twelve cylinders, power: 390 hp and weight: 530 kg.
Victories in 1966: Belgian Grand Prix in Spa (driver: John Surtees from England) as well as Italian Grand Prix in Monza (driver: Lodovico Scarfiotti from Italy).
Victory in 1968: French Grand Prix in Rouen (driver: Jacky Ickx from Belgium).


03A009.jpg

Ferrari Tipo 312B (1970 and 1971)

As from 1970, Ferrari used the 312B as the successor to the T 312. Instead of the V12 engine fitted until then, it was equipped with a boxer engine. The team which had not win any races at all in the Formula-1 World Championship in 1969 was reorganised. With success - the Ferrari won four of the last five races of the season.
The Ferrari driver Jacky Ickx was the runner-up in the World Championship in 1970.
Capacity: 3000 ccm, twelve cylinders, power: 450 hp and weight: 530 kg.
Victories in 1970: Austrian Grand Prix in Zeltweg, Canadian Grand Prix in Mont Tremblant and Mexican Grand Prix in Mexico City (driver in each case: Jacky Ickx from Belgium) as well as Italian Grand Prix in Monza (driver: Clay Regazzoni from Switzerland).
Victory in 1971: South African Grand Prix in Kyalami (driver: Mario Andretti from the USA).


03A010.jpg

Ferrari Tipo 312B2 (1971 - 1973)

In 1974, Niki Lauda came to Ferrari. As four years previously, the team was reorganised. And success returned. Clay Regazzoni was the runner-up in the World Championship after Ferrari had not won any races at all in 1973.
Capacity: 3000 ccm, twelve cylinders, power: 490 hp and weight: 575 kg.
Victories in 1974: Spanish Grand Prix in Jarama and Dutch Grand Prix in Zandvoort (driver in each case: Niki Lauda from Austria) as well as German Grand Prix at the Nürburgring (driver: Clay Regazzoni from Switzerland).


Ferrari Tipo 312T (1975 and 1976)

Eleven years long (since 1964 with John Surtees as the driver), Ferrari had to wait for the World-Championship title before Niki Lauda managed it in 1975 with the 312T. The new racer was used for the first time in the third race of the 1975 season and, up to the beginning of 1976, won nine of the 15 races in which it competed and became one of Ferrari's most successful Formula-1 racing cars.
Capacity: 3000 ccm, twelve cylinders, power: 495 hp and weight: 575 kg.
Victories in 1975: Monaco Grand Prix, Belgian Grand Prix in Zolder, Swedish Grand Prix in Anderstorp, French Grand Prix in Le Castellet and USA Grand Prix in Watkins Glen (driver in each case: Niki Lauda from Austria) as well as Italian Grand Prix in Monza (driver: Clay Regazzoni from Switzerland).
Victories in 1976: Brazilian Grand Prix in Interlagos and South African Grand Prix in Kyalami (driver in each case: Niki Lauda from Austria) as well as USA Grand Prix in Long Beach (driver: Clay Regazzoni from Switzerland).


03A012.jpg

Ferrari Tipo 312T2 (1976 and 1977)

The Tipo 312T2 continued to win where the Tipo 312T had left off. It was used as from the middle of 1976. Niki Lauda was well on the way to retaining the World Championship when he had a serious accident at the Nürburgring and therefore was only the runner-up in the World Championship. One year later, the Austrian then secured the World-Championship title once again.
Capacity: 3000 ccm, twelve cylinders, power: 500 hp and weight: 575 kg.
Victories in 1976: Monaco Grand Prix, Belgian Grand Prix in Zolder and English Grand Prix in Brands Hatch (driver in each case: Niki Lauda from Austria).
Victories in 1977: South African Grand Prix in Kyalami, German Grand Prix in Hockenheim and Dutch Grand Prix in Zandvoort (driver in each case: Niki Lauda from Austria) as well as Brazilian Grand Prix in Interlagos (Carlos Reutemann from Argentina).


03A014.jpg

Ferrari Tipo 312T4 (1979)

For more than 20 years, the Tipo 312T4 was to remain the last Ferrari to carry its driver to the World Championship. In 1979, it was Jody Scheckter. Only in 2000 did Michael Schumacher end the longest "lean period" in Ferrari's Formula-1 history by winning the title.
Capacity: 3000 ccm, twelve cylinders, power: 515 hp and weight: 590 kg.
Victories in 1979: Belgian Grand Prix in Zolder, Monaco Grand Prix and Italian Grand Prix in Monza (driver in each case: Jody Scheckter from South Africa) as well as South African Grand Prix in Kyalami and USA Grand Prix in Long Beach (driver in each case: Gilles Villeneuve from Canada).


03A015.jpg

Ferrari Tipo 126CK (1981)

For Ferrari, the turbo age in Formula 1 began with the type 126CK. After Renault (since 1977), Ferrari was the second manufacturer to use turbo engines. In 1981, they were then followed by BMW and Hart as well.
Capacity: 1500 ccm with turbo supercharging, six cylinders, power: 580 hp and weight: 610 kg.
Victories in 1981: Spanish Grand Prix in Jarama and Monaco Grand Prix (driver in each case: Gilles Villeneuve from Canada).


Ferrari Tipo 126C2/C3 (1982 and 1983)

In 1982 and 1983, Ferrari won the constructors' title in the Formula-1 World Championship. The C2 and the C3 were used. In 1982, the Ferrari driver Didier Pironi was clearly on course to secure the drivers' title before a serious crash in training in Hockenheim ruined his good chances. He was nevertheless the runner-up in the World Championship.
Capacity: 1500 ccm with turbo supercharging, six cylinders, power: 580 hp (C3: 600 hp) and weight: 595 kg.
Victories in 1982: San Marino Grand Prix in Imola and Dutch Grand Prix in Zandvoort (driver in each case: Didier Pironi from France) as well as German Grand Prix in Hockenheim (driver: Patrick Tambay from France).
Victories in 1983: San Marino Grand Prix in Imola (driver: Patrick Tambay from France) as well as Canadian Grand Prix in Montreal, German Grand Prix in Hockenheim and Dutch Grand Prix in Zandvoort (driver in each case: René Arnoux from France).


03A017.jpg

Ferrari F1.86/F1.87 Turbo (1986 to 1988)

In 1986, the old familiar word Tipo (type) disappeared from the designation of Ferrari's Formula-1 racing cars. The F1.86 and the F1.87, Ferrari's last Formula-1 racing cars with a turbo engine, were used until 1988. Then, only cars with a naturally aspirated engine were allowed as from 1989. In these last few "turbo years", Ferrari once again found itself in a trough, managing to win just three out of 48 races.
Capacity: 1500 ccm with turbocharging, six cylinders, power: 850 hp (in 1988, because the turbo was restricted to 2.5 bar: 600 hp) and weight: 540 kg.
Victories in 1987: Japanese Grand Prix in Suzuka and Australian Grand Prix in Adelaide (driver in each case: Gerhard Berger from Austria).
Victory in 1988: Italian Grand Prix in Monza (driver: Gerhard Berger from Austria).


03A018.jpg

Ferrari 640 V12 (1989 and 1990)

In the first two years of the new "era of naturally aspirated engines" (maximum capacity: 3500 ccm), Ferrari returned to the success trail once again. No wonder with drivers like Nigel Mansell, Gerhard Berger or Alain Prost. In 1990, Prost had real title chances before Ayrton Senna shot him down in Japan with the (in)famous and intentional collision on the first lap.
Capacity: 3500 ccm, twelve cylinders, power: 660 hp (in 1990: 685 hp) and weight: 500 kg.
Victories in 1989: Brazilian Grand Prix in Rio de Janeiro and Hungarian Grand Prix at the Hungaroring (driver in each case: Nigel Mansell from England) as well as Portuguese Grand Prix in Estoril (driver: Gerhard Berger from Austria).
Victories in 1990: Brazilian Grand Prix in Interlagos, Mexican Grand Prix, French Grand Prix in Le Castellet, English Grand Prix in Silverstone and Spanish Grand Prix in Jerez (driver in each case: Alain Prost from France) as well as Portuguese Grand Prix in Estoril (driver: Nigel Mansell from England).
The Ferrari driver Alain Prost was the runner-up in the World Championship in 1990.


03A019.jpg

Ferrari F92/F93 (1992 and 1993)

In 1992 and 1993, Ferrari did not manage a single Grand-Prix win with the types F92 and F93. The Scuderia once again had a lean period in the Formula-1 World Championship, in spite of drivers such as Jean Alesi or Gerhard Berger.
Capacity: 3500 ccm, twelve cylinders, power: 750 hp and weight: 515 kg.


03A020.jpg

Ferrari 412 (1994 and 1995)

With the 412, Ferrari used a Formula-1 racing car with a twelve-cylinder engine for the last time. After the fatal accident of Ayrton Senna in Imola in 1994, the maximum capacity was, as from 1995, limited to 3000 ccm (instead of 3500 ccm) and the minimum weight increased in order to make the cars slower.
412 T1 - capacity: 3500 ccm, twelve cylinders, power: almost 800 hp and weight: 515 kg.
Victory in 1994: German Grand Prix in Hockenheim (driver: Gerhard Berger from Austria).
412 T2 - capacity: 3000 ccm, ten cylinders, power: 800 hp and weight: 595 kg.
Victory in 1995: Canadian Grand Prix in Montreal (driver: Jean Alesi from France).


03A021.jpg

Ferrari F310 (1996 to 1999)

For the 1996 season, Ferrari completely restructured the Formula-1 team: At the instigation of the team boss Jean Todt and the adviser Niki Lauda, the Formula-1 World Champion Michael Schumacher, probably the best driver in the world, was signed on. Amongst other measures, he brought the racing strategist Ross Brawn with him from Benetton. Objective: the first Drivers' World Championship since 1979. The F310 was refined continuously in the years up to 1999 but "only" managed the title in the Constructors' World Championship in 1999.
Capacity: 3000 ccm, ten cylinders, power: 800 hp and weight: 585 kg.
Victories in 1996: Spanish Grand Prix in Barcelona, Belgian Grand Prix in Spa and Italian Grand Prix in Monza (driver in each case: Michael Schumacher from Germany).
The Ferrari driver Michael Schumacher was the runner-up in the World Championship in 1996.
Victories in 1997: Monaco Grand Prix, Canadian Grand Prix in Montreal, French Grand Prix in Magny-Cours, Belgian Grand Prix in Spa and Japanese Grand Prix in Suzuka (driver in each case: Michael Schumacher from Germany).
Michael Schumacher, the runner-up in the World Championship on points, was stripped off all his points because he had attempted to "shoot down" his competitor Jacques Villeneuve in the deciding race for the World Championship in Jerez.
Victories in 1998: Argentinian Grand Prix in Buenos Aires, Canadian Grand Prix in Montreal, French Grand Prix in Magny-Cours, English Grand Prix in Silverstone, Hungarian Grand Prix at the Hungaroring and Italian Grand Prix in Monza (driver in each case: Michael Schumacher from Germany).
The Ferrari driver Michael Schumacher was the runner-up in the World Championship in 1998.
Victories in 1999: Australian Grand Prix in Melbourne, Austrian Grand Prix at the A1-Ring, German Grand Prix in Hockenheim and Malaysian Grand Prix in Sepang (driver in each case: Eddie Irvine from Northern Ireland) as well as San Marino Grand Prix in Imola and Monaco Grand Prix (driver in each case: Michael Schumacher from Germany).
The Ferrari driver Eddie Irvine was the runner-up in the World Championship in 1999.
Ferrari won the Constructors' World Championship in 1999.


03A022.jpg

Ferrari F1.2000-2003 (2000 to 2003)

For more than 20 years (since 1979), Ferrari had been "chasing after" success in the Drivers' World Championship in Formula 1. In 2000, Michael Schumacher was then able to secure the most important title for the Italian racing team once again. His World-Championship car: the Ferrari F1.2000. Michael Schumacher and Ferrari continued the series of success and won the World Championship in 2001 and 2002 as well with the types F1.2001 and F1.2002.
Capacity: 3000 ccm, ten cylinders, power: over 800 hp (until 2002: over 850 hp) and weight: 600 kg.
Victories in 2000: Australian Grand Prix in Melbourne, Brazilian Grand Prix in Interlagos, San Marino Grand Prix in Imola, European Grand Prix at the Nürburgring, Canadian Grand Prix in Montreal, Italian Grand Prix in Monza, USA Grand Prix in Indianapolis, Japanese Grand Prix in Suzuka and Malaysian Grand Prix in Sepang (driver in each case: Michael Schumacher from Germany) as well as German Grand Prix in Hockenheim (driver: Rubens Barrichello from Brazil).
The Ferrari driver Michael Schumacher was the Drivers' World Champion in 2000.
Ferrari won the Constructors' World Championship.
Victories in 2001: Australian Grand Prix in Melbourne, Malaysian Grand Prix in Sepang, Spanish Grand Prix in Barcelona, Monaco Grand Prix, European Grand Prix at the Nürburgring, French Grand Prix in Magny-Cours, Hungarian Grand Prix at the Hungaroring, Belgian Grand Prix in Spa and Japanese Grand Prix in Suzuka (driver in each case: Michael Schumacher from Germany).
The Ferrari driver Michael Schumacher was the Drivers' World Champion in 2001.
Ferrari won the Constructors' World Championship.
Victories in 2002: Australian Grand Prix in Melbourne, Brazilian Grand Prix in Interlagos, San Marino Grand Prix in Imola, Spanish Grand Prix in Barcelona, Austrian Grand Prix at the A1-Ring, Canadian Grand Prix in Montreal, English Grand Prix in Silverstone, French Grand Prix in Magny-Cours, German Grand Prix in Hockenheim, Belgian Grand Prix in Spa and Japanese Grand Prix in Suzuka (driver in each case: Michael Schumacher from Germany) as well as European Grand Prix at the Nürburgring, Hungarian Grand Prix at the Hungaroring, Italian Grand Prix in Monza and USA Grand Prix in Indianapolis (driver in each case: Rubens Barrichello from Brazil).
The Ferrari driver Michael Schumacher was the Drivers' World Champion in 2002.
Ferrari won the Constructors' World Championship.

 

FERRARI FORMEL 1 - VON 1948 BIS 2003

Einmalige Präsentation zur Ferrari-Formel 1-Historie - über 20 Boliden aus den letzten 55 Jahren, die bisher insgesamt 24 WM-Titel und über 160 Grand Prix-Siege herausfuhren

Formel 1 - das ist der Mythos im Automobilrennsport. Ferrari - das ist der Mythos in der Formel 1. Seit Beginn der Forme1 1-Weltmeisterschaft im Jahr 1950 ist Ferrari ununterbrochen in diesem wichtigsten Championat dabei - als einziges Team überhaupt. Die feuerroten Formel 1-Boliden aus Maranello haben die Geschichte der WM maßgebend beeinflußt. Ferrari ist das erfolgreichste Team der Historie. Immer wieder gab es Höhen und Tiefen. So mußte Ferrari z.B. von 1979 bis 2000 warten, ehe es wieder einen Fahrer-Weltmeister stellen konnte. Sein Name Michael Schumacher...

In diesem Jahr sind in Essen auf einer einmaligen Sonderpräsentation über 20 Ferrari-Grand Prix-Boliden zu sehen. Sie bieten Einblick in die Entwicklung des Formel 1-Sports. Angefangen mit dem Typ 125 aus dem Jahr 1948 (noch vor Einführung der Weltmeisterschaft) bis hin zum aktuellen F2003. Eine so umfangreiche und hochkarätige Ansammlung von Ferrari-Formel 1-Autos hat es auf einer Publikums-Messe noch nie gegeben.

Die Ferrari-Rekorde in der Weltmeisterschaft
(Stand: 14. September 2003 nach dem Grand Prix von Italien)

12 Fahrer-Titel (2. Platz McLaren mit 11 Titeln)
1952 und 1953: Alberto Ascari (Italien) - damals mit Formel 2-Autos ausgetragen
1956: Juan Manuel Fangio (Argentinien)
1958: Mike Hawthorn (England)
1961: Phil Hill (USA)
1964: John Surtees (England)
1975 und 1977: Niki Lauda (Österreich)
1979: Jody Scheckter (Südafrika)
2000 bis 2002: Michael Schumacher (Deutschland)

12 Konstrukteurs-Titel (2. Platz Williams mit 9 Titeln)
1961, 1964, 1975 bis 1977, 1979, 1982 und 1983, 1999 bis 2003.
Anmerkung: Den Konstrukteurs-Titel gibt es offiziell seit 1958. "Inoffiziell" hat ihn Ferrari auch 1952, 1953 und 1956 gewonnen.


165 Siege in WM-Läufen (2. Platz McLaren mit 137 Siegen)
165 Pole Positionen (2. Platz Williams mit 123)
166 Schnellste Runden (2. Platz Williams mit 126)

Firmengründer Enzo Ferrari (geboren am 18. Februar 1898) starb am 14. August 1988) im Alter von 90 Jahren in seinem Haus in Modena. Von 1919 bis 1932 war er aktiver Rennfahrer, ohne aber den ganz großen Erfolg verbuchen zu können. 1929 gründete er die Scuderia Ferrari, die in den 30er-Jahren der offizielle Rennstall von Alfa Romeo wurde. Fahrer wie Tazio Nuvolari, Achille Varzi oder Louis Chiron siegten bei der Mille Miglia, beim 24-Stunden-Rennen in Le Mans, beim Großen Preis von Belgien oder beim Großen Preis von Deutschland auf dem Nürburgring.


Gegen die Mercedes und Auto Union-Rennwagen hatte er allerdings in den Jahren 1933 bis 1939 im Grand Prix-Sport kaum eine Chance. 1939 trennte er sich im Streit von Alfa Romeo und begann eigene Autos zu bauen - natürlich Rennwagen. 1940 (Italien war noch nicht in den 2. Weltkrieg eingetreten- Beginn am 1. September 1939) starteten bei der Mille Miglia zwei Ferrari-Sportwagen, die aber aus Vertragsgründen ("Trennungs-Vertrag" mit Alfa Romeo) ANSA hießen.

Zum ersten Start eines "echten" Ferrari kam es nach dem Ende des 2. Weltkrieges am 11. Mai 1947 bei einem Sportwagenrennen in Piacenza in Italien. Das Auto mit Franco Cortese (Italien) fiel aus.

Seit 1948 beteiligte sich Ferrari neben Sportwagen-Rennen auch an der Formel 1 und begann mit dem Bau von sportlichen Serienwagen, die wegen der vielen Rennerfolge seiner Firma (z.B. 1949 erster Gesamtsieg in Le Mans, Grand Prix-Siege in der Schweiz und Italien) rasch zum Status-Symbol von gekrönten Häuptern und Filmstars wurden.

1952 wurde zum ersten Mal ein Ferrari-Pilot (Alberto Ascari) Fahrerweltmeister. Bis heute folgten elf weitere Titel. 1953 gab es den ersten Titel eines Sportwagen-Weltmeisters für Ferrari. Bis 1973 konnte Ferrari 13 weitere Titel in dieser Kategorie verbuchen. Was heute fast vergessen ist: Ferrari beteiligte sich mit seinem Team in den 60er- und 70er-Jahren auch an Formel 2-Rennen und Läufen zur Europa-Bergmeisterschaft.

Seit 1974 konzentrierte sich Ferrari im Automobilsport exklusiv auf die Formel 1. Heute gehört Ferrari zur Fiat-Gruppe.


03A001.jpg

Ferrari Tipo 125 (Jahre 1948/49)

Der erste Formel 1-Rennwagen mit dem Namen Ferrari.
1500 ccm Hubraum mit Kompressor, 12 Zylinder, 230 PS, Gewicht: 700 kg.
Siege 1949: GP Schweiz/Bern-Bremgarten und GP Italien/Monza (Fahrer jeweils Alberto Ascari aus Italien).


03A002.jpg

Ferrari Tipo 375 (Jahr 1951)

Im zweiten Jahr der Formel 1-WM ging Ferrari einen neuen Weg. Anstelle des 1,5 Liters mit Kompressor setzte er einen Renner mit 4,5-Liter-Saugmotor ein (beide Varianten waren damals laut Reglement zugelassen). Der Tipo 375 gewann 1951 den ersten Formel 1-WM-Lauf für Ferrari überhaupt - in Silverstone.
4500 ccm Hubraum, 12 Zylinder, 360 PS, Gewicht: 850 kg.
Siege 1951: GP England/Silverstone (Fahrer Jose Froilan Gonzalez aus Argentinien), GP Deutschland/Nürburgring und GP Italien/Monza (Fahrer jeweils Alberto Ascari aus Italien).
Ferrari-Pilot Ascari wurde Vize-Weltmeister.


03A003.jpg

Ferrari Tipo 625 (Jahre 1954/55)

Gegen Mercedes-Benz hatte die Konkurrenz in den Jahren 1954 und 1955 kaum Chancen. Ferrari setzte in diesen beiden Jahren drei verschiedene Typen ein. Erfolgreichster war der Tipo 625.
2500 ccm Hubraum, vier Zylinder, 250 PS Leistung, Gewicht: 600 kg.
Sieg 1954: GP England/Silverstone (Fahrer Jose Froilan Gonzalez aus Argentinien).
Sieg 1955: GP Monaco (Maurice Trintignant aus Frankreich).
Ferrari-Pilot Jose Froilan Gonzalez wurde 1954 Vize-Weltmeister.


03A004.jpg

Ferrari Tipo 555 Superqualo (Jahre 1954/55)

Markante Kennzeichen waren damals die Seitentanks, die dem Wagen ein breites Aussehen gaben.
2500 ccm Hubraum, vier Zylinder, 250 PS Leistung, Gewicht: 600 kg.
Sieg 1954: GP Spanien/Barcelona (Fahrer Mike Hawthorn aus England.


03A005.jpg

Ferrari-Lancia D50 (Jahre 1956/57)

Als sich Lancia Mitte 1955 aus der Formel 1 zurückzog, übergab die Firma alles Formel 1-Material an Ferrari. Dort wurde der Wagen weiterentwickelt und gewann 1956 mit Juan Manuel Fangio als Piloten die Weltmeisterschaft.
2500 ccm Hubraum, acht Zylinder, 285 PS Leistung, Gewicht: 650 kg.
Siege 1956: GP Argentinien/Buenos Aires (*Fahrer Fangio/Luigi Musso), GP Belgien/Spa und GP Frankreich/Reims ( Fahrer jeweils Peter Collins aus England), GP England/Silverstone und GP Deutschland/Nürburgring (Fahrer jeweils Juan Manuel Fangio aus Argentinien).
* = damals waren Fahrerwechsel während des Rennens erlaubt.

03A006.jpg

Ferrari Tipo 246 Dino (Jahre 1958-1960)

Der Ferrari 246 Dino (benannt nach Ferraris Sohn, der 1956 gestorben war) war der letzte Formel 1-Rennwagen mit Frontmotor, der einen Formel 1-WM-Lauf gewann - 1960 in Monza in Italien.
2500 ccm Hubraum, sechs Zylinder, 280 PS Leistung, Gewicht: 560 kg.
Siege 1958: GP Frankreich/Reims (Fahrer: Mike Hawthorn aus England) und GP England/Silverstone (Fahrer: Peter Collins aus England).
Siege 1959: GP Frankreich/Reims und GP Deutschland/Avus (Fahrer jeweils Tony Brooks aus England).
Sieg 1960: GP Italien/Monza (Fahrer: Phil Hill aus den USA).
Ferrari-Pilot Mike Hawthorn wurde 1958 mit dem 246 Weltmeister, Tony Brooks 1959 Vize-Weltmeister.


03A007.jpg

Ferrari Tipo 156 (Jahre 1961-1963)

Von 1961 bis 1965 galt in der Formel 1 ein Hubraumlimit von 1500 ccm (von 1954 bis 1960 war es 2500 ccm gewesen). Ferrari hatte 1961 mit Phil Hill den WM-Titel gewonnen, seinen Piloten Graf Berghe von Trips aber durch den tödlichen Unfall in Monza verloren. In den folgenden zwei Jahren war die Bilanz mager (nur ein einziger GP-Sieg). Von den 156ern existiert kein Original-Auto mehr. Ferrari hatte sie alle zerstören lassen. Pop-Sänder Chris Rea liess allerdings einen Nachbau realisieren.
1500 ccm Hubraum, sechs Zylinder, 200 PS Leistung, Gewicht: 470 kg.
Siege 1961: GP Niederlande/Zandvoort, England/Aintree (Fahrer jeweils Graf Trips aus Deutschland), GB Belgien/Spa, GP Italien/Monza (jeweils Phil Hill aus den USA) und GP Frankreich/ Reims (Giancarlo Baghetti aus Italien).
Sieg 1963: GP Deutschland/Nürburgring (John Surtees aus England).


03A008.jpg

Ferrari Tipo 312 (Jahre 1966-1969)

Ab 1966 galt in der Formel 1 ein neues Reglement. Der Maximalhubraum für Autos mit Saugmotor betrug 3000 ccm und 1500 ccm für Fahrzeuge mit Aufladung. Ferrari entwickelte für die neue Formel 1 den Tipo 312.
3000 ccm Hubraum, 12 Zylinder, 390 PS Leistung, Gewicht: 530 kg.
Siege 1966: GP Belgien/Spa (Fahrer John Surtees aus England) und GP Italien/Monza (Lodovico Scarfiotti aus Italien).
Sieg 1968: GP Frankreich/Rouen (Fahrer Jacky Ickx aus Belgien).


03A009.jpg

Ferrari Tipo 312B (Jahre 1970/71)

Als Nachfolger des T 312 setzte Ferrari ab 1970 den 312B ein. Er erhielt anstelle des bisherigen V12- einen Boxer-Motor. Das Team, das 1969 ohne Formel 1-WM-Sieg geblieben war, wurde umorganisiert. Mit Erfolg, den Ferrari gewann von den letzten fünf Rennen der Saison vier. Jacky Ickx wurde 1970 Vize-Weltmeister.
3000 ccm Hubraum, 12 Zylinder, 450 PS Leistung, Gewicht: 530 kg.
Siege 1970: GP Österreich/Zeltweg, GP Kanada/Mont Tremblant, GP Mexiko/Mexiko City (Fahrer jeweils Jacky Ickx aus Belgien) und GP Italien/Monza (Fahrer: Clay Regazzoni aus der Schweiz).
Sieg 1971: GP Südafrika/Kyalami (Fahrer Mario Andretti aus den USA).


03A010.jpg

Ferrari Tipo 312B2 (Jahr 1971 - 1973)

1974 kam Niki Lauda zu Ferrari. Das Team wurde - wie vier Jahre vorher - reorganisiert. Und der Erfolg kam zurück. Clay Regazzoni wurde Vize-Weltmeister, nachdem Ferrari 1973 ohne Sieg geblieben war.
3000 ccm Hubraum, 12 Zylinder, 490 PS Leistung, Gewicht: 575 kg.
Siege 1974: GP Spanien/Jarama, GP Niederlande/Zandvoort (Fahrer jeweils Niki Lauda aus Österreich), GP Deutschland/Nürburgring (Fahrer: Clay Regazzoni aus der Schweiz).


Ferrari Tipo 312T (Jahre 1975/76)

Elf Jahre - seit 1964 (Fahrer: John Surtees) - mußte Ferrari auf den WM-Titel warten, ehe es 1975 Niki Lauda mit dem 312T schaffte. Der erstmals im dritten Saisonrennen 1975 eingesetzte neue Bolide gewann bis Anfang 1976 neun der 15 Rennen, in denen er startete und avancierte zu einem der erfolgreichsten Ferrari Formel 1-Rennwagen.
3000 ccm Hubraum, 12 Zylinder, 495 PS Leistung, Gewicht: 575 kg.
Siege 1975: GP Monaco, GP Belgien/Zolder, GP Schweden/Anderstorp, GP Frankreich/Le Castellet, GP USA/Watkins Glen (Fahrer jeweils Niki Lauda aus Österreich), GP Italien/Monza (Fahrer: Clay Regazzoni aus der Schweiz).
Siege 1976: GP Brasilien/Interlagos, GP Südafrika/Kyalami (Fahrer jeweils Niki Lauda aus Österreich), GP Long Beach/USA (Fahrer Clay Regazzoni aus der Schweiz).


03A012.jpg

Ferrari Tipo 312T2 (Jahre 1976/77)

Der Tipo 312T2 siegte da weiter, wo der T1 aufgehört hatte. Eingesetzt ab Mitte 1976 war Niki Lauda auf dem Weg zur erneuten Weltmeisterschaft, als er auf dem Nürburgring schwer verunglückte und deshalb nur Vize-Weltmeister wurde. Ein Jahr später gewann der Österreicher dann erneut den WM-Titel.
3000 ccm Hubraum, 12 Zylinder, 500 PS Leistung, Gewicht: 575 kg.
Siege 1976: GP Monaco, GP Belgien/Zolder und GP England/Brands Hatch (Fahrer jeweils Niki Lauda aus Österreich).
Siege 1977: GP Südafrika/Kyalami, GP Deutschland/Hockenheim und GP Holland/Zandvoort (Fahrer jeweils Niki Lauda aus Österreich) sowie GB Brasilien/Interlagos (Carlos Reutemann aus Argentinien).


03A014.jpg

Ferrari Tipo 312T4 (Jahr 1979)

Der Tipo 312T4 sollte mehr als 20 Jahre der letzte Ferrari bleiben, mit dem ein Pilot Fahrer-Weltmeister wurde. 1979 war es Jody Scheckter. Erst 2000 beendete Michael Schumacher mit dem Titelgewinn die längste "Durststrecke" in der Ferrari-Formel 1-Historie.
3000 ccm Hubraum, 12 Zylinder, 515 PS Leistung, Gewicht: 590 kg.
Siege 1979: GP Belgien/Zolder, GP Monaco und GP Italien/Monza (Fahrer jeweils Jody Scheckter aus Südafrika) sowie GP Südafrika/Kyalami und GP Long Beach ( jeweils Gilles Villeneuve aus Kanada).


03A015.jpg

Ferrari Tipo 126CK (Jahr 1981)

Mit dem Typ 126CK begann für Ferrari das Turbo-Zeitalter in der Formel 1. Ferrari war nach Renault (seit 1977) der zweite Hersteller, der Turbo-Motoren einsetzte. Im Jahr 1981 folgten dann noch BMW und Hart.
1500 ccm Hubraum mit Turbo-Aufladung, sechs Zylinder, 580 PS Leistung, Gewicht: 610 kg.
Siege 1981: GP Spanien/Jarama und GP Monaco (Fahrer jeweils Gilles Villeneuve aus Kanada).


Ferrari Tipo 126C2/C3 (Jahre 1982 und 1983)

In den Jahren 1982 und 1983 gewann Ferrari jeweils den Konstrukteurs-Titel in der Formel 1-WM. Eingesetzt wurden der C2 und C3. 1982 war Ferrari-Pilot Didier Pironi klar auf dem Kurs zum Gewinn des Fahrertitels, ehe ein schwerer Sturz im Training in Hockenheim seine guten Chancen zunichte machte. Er wurde noch Vize-Weltmeister.
1500 ccm Hubraum mit Turbo-Aufladung, sechs Zylinder, 580 PS (600 PS C3) Leistung, Gewicht: 595 kg.
Siege 1982: GP San Marino/Imola und GP Niederlande/Zandvoort (Fahrer jeweils Didier Pironi aus Frankreich) sowie GP Deutschland/Hockenheim (Patrick Tambay aus Frankreich).
Siege 1983: GP San Marino/Imola (Patrick Tambay aus Frankreich) sowie GP Kanada/Montreal, GP Deutschland/Hockenheim und GP Niederlande/Zandvoort (jeweils Rene Arnoux aus Frankreich).


03A017.jpg

Ferrari F1.86/F1.87 Turbo (Jahre 1986-1988)

1986 verschwand das altbekannte Kürzel Tipo (Typ) aus der Bezeichnung der Ferrari-Formel 1-Rennwagen. Bis 1988 wurden der F1.86 und der F1.87 eingesetzt - die letzten Ferrari-Formel 1-Rennwagen mit Turbo-Motor. Ab 1989 waren dann nur noch Autos mit Saugmotoren zugelassen. Ferrari befand sich in diesen letzten "Turbo-Jahren" mal wieder im Wellental. Nur drei von 48 Rennen konnten gewonnen werden.
1500 ccm Hubraum mit Turbo-Aufladung, sechs Zylinder, 850 PS Leistung (1988 wegen Beschränkung des Turbo auf 2.5 bar: 600 PS), Gewicht: 540 kg.
Siege 1987: GP Japan/Suzuka und GP Australien/Adelaide (Fahrer jeweils Gerhard Berger aus Österreich).
Sieg 1988: GP Italien/Monza (Gerhard Berger aus Österreich).


03A018.jpg

Ferrari 640 V12 (Jahre 1989 und 1990)

In den ersten beiden Jahren der neuen "Saugmotor-Ära" (maximaler Hubraum 3500 ccm) kehrte Ferrari wieder in die Erfolgsspur zurück. Kein Wunder bei Fahrern wie Nigel Mansell, Gerhard Berger oder Alain Prost. 1990 hatte Prost reelle Titelchancen, ehe ihn Ayrton Senna in Japan bei der berühmt-berüchtigten und gewollten Kollision in der ersten Runde abschoß.
3500 ccm Hubraum, 12 Zylinder, 660 PS Leistung (1990: 685), Gewicht: 500 kg.
Siege 1989: GP Brasilien/Rio de Janeiro, GP Ungarn/Hungaroring (Fahrer jeweils Nigel Mansell aus England) und GP Portugal/Estoril (Fahrer Gerhard Berger aus Österreich).
Siege 1990: GP Brasilien/Interlagos, GP Mexiko, GP Frankreich/Le Castellet, GP England/Silverstone, GP Spanien/Jerez (Fahrer jeweils Alain Prost aus Frankreich) und GP Portugal/Estoril (Nigel Mansell aus England).
Ferrari-Pilot Alain Prost wurde 1990 Vize-Weltmeister.


03A019.jpg

Ferrari F92/93 (Jahre 1992 und 1993)

In den Jahren 1992 und 1993 schaffte Ferrari mit den Typen F92 und F93 keinen einzigen Grand Prix-Sieg. Die Scuderia hatte wieder einmal eine Durststrecke in der Formel 1-WM, und das trotz Fahrern wie Jean Alesi oder Gerhard Berger.
3500 ccm Hubraum, 12 Zylinder, 750 PS Leistung, Gewicht: 515 kg.


03A020.jpg

Ferrari 412 (Jahre 1994 und 1995)

Mit dem 412 setzte Ferrari zum letzten Mal einen Formel 1-Rennwagen mit 12-Zylinder-Motor ein. Nach dem tödlichen Unfall von Ayrton Senna 1994 in Imola wurde der Maximal-Hubraum ab 1995 auf anstelle von 3500 ccm auf 3000 ccm begrenzt und das Mindestgewicht erhöht, um die Wagen langsamer zu machen.
412 T1: 3500 ccm Hubraum, 12 Zylinder, fast 800 PS Leistung, Gewicht: 515 kg.
Sieg 1994: GP Deutschland/Hockenheim (Fahrer Gerhard Berger aus Österreich).
412 T2: 3000 ccm Hubraum, zehn Zylinder, 800 PS Leistung, Gewicht: 595 kg.
Sieg 1995: GP Kanada/Montreal (Fahrer Jean Alesi aus Frankreich).


03A021.jpg

Ferrari F310 (Jahre 1996 bis 1999)

Für die Saison 1996 strukturierte Ferrari das Formel 1-Team komplett um: Auf Betreiben von Team-Chef Jean Todt und Berater Niki Lauda wurde mit Formel 1-Weltmeister Michael Schumacher der wohl beste Pilot der Welt verpflichtet, der u.a. den Renn-Strategen Ross Brawn von Benetton mitbrachte. Ziel: die erste Fahrer-WM seit 1979. Der F310 wurde in den Jahren bis 1999 immer weiterentwickelt, schaffte aber "nur" den Konstrukteurs-WM-Titel im Jahr 1999.
3000 ccm Hubraum, 10 Zylinder, 800 PS Leistung, Gewicht: 585 kg.
Siege 1996: GP Spanien/Barcelona, GP Belgien/Spa und GP Italien/Monza (Fahrer jeweils Michael Schumacher aus Deutschland).
Ferrari-Pilot Michael Schumacher wurde 1996 Vize-Weltmeister.
Siege 1997: GP Monaco, GP Kanada/Montreal, GP Frankreich/Magny-Cours, GP Belgien/Spa und GP Japan/Suzuka (Michael Schumacher aus Deutschland).
Michael Schumacher - nach Punkten Vize-Weltmeister - wurden alle Punkte aberkannt, weil er versucht hatte, im entscheidenden Rennen um die WM in Jerez seinen Konkurrenten Jacques Villeneuve "abzuschießen".
Siege 1998: GP Argentinien/Buenos Aires, GP Kanada/Montreal, GP Frankreich/Magny-Cours, GP GB/Silverstone, GP Ungarn/Hungaroring und GP Italien/Monza (Michael Schumacher).
Ferrari-Pilot Michael Schumacher wurde 1998 Vize-Weltmeister.
Siege 1999: GP Australien/Melbourne, GP Österreich/A1-Ring, GP Deutschland/Hockenheim, GP Malaysia/Sepang (Fahrer jeweils Eddie Irvine) sowie GP San Marino/Imola und GP Monaco (Michael Schumacher).
Ferrari-Pilot Eddie Irvine wurde 1999 Vize-Weltmeister.
Ferrari gewann 1999 die Konstrukteurs-Weltmeisterschaft.


03A022.jpg

Ferrari F1.2000-2003 (Jahre 2000 bis 2003)

Über 20 Jahre - seit 1979 - war Ferrari dem Gewinn der Formel 1-Fahrer-WM "hinterhergefahren". Im Jahr 2000 dann konnte Michael Schumacher wieder den wichtigsten Titel für den italienischen Rennstall gewinnen. Sein WM-Auto: der Ferrari F1.2000. Michael Schumacher und Ferrari setzten die Erfolgsserie fort und gewannen auch 2001 und 2002 mit den Typen F1.2001 und F1.2002 die WM.
3000 ccm Hubraum, 10 Zylinder, über 800 PS Leistung (bis 2002 auf über 850 PS), Gewicht: 600 kg.
Siege 2000: GP Australien/Melbourne, GP Brasilien/Interlagos, GP San Marino/Imola, GP Europa/Nürburgring, GP Kanada/Montreal, GP Italien/Monza, GP USA/Indianapolis, GP Japan/Suzuka und GP Malaysia/Sepang (Fahrer jeweils Michael Schumacher aus Deutschland) sowie GP Deutschland/Hockenheim (Rubens Barrichello).
Ferrari-Pilot Michael Schumacher wurde 2000 Fahrer-Weltmeister.
Ferrari gewann die Konstrukteurs-Weltmeisterschaft.
Siege 2001: GP Australien/Melbourne, GP Malaysia/Sepang, GP Spanien/Barcelona, GP Monaco, GP Europa/Nürburgring, GP Frankreich/Magny-Cours, GP Ungarn/Hungaroring, GP Belgien/Spa, GP Japan/Suzuka (Fahrer jeweils Michael Schumacher aus Deutschland).
Ferrari-Pilot Michael Schumacher wurde 2001 Fahrer-Weltmeister.
Ferrari gewann die Konstrukteurs-Weltmeisterschaft.
Siege 2002: GP Australien/Melbourne, GP Brasilien/Interlagos, GP San Marino/Imola, GP Spanien/Barcelona, GP Österreich/A1-Ring, GP Kanada/Montreal, GP England/Silverstone, GP Frankreich/Magny-Cours, GP Deutschland/Hockenheim, GP Belgien/Spa und GP Japan/Suzuka (Fahrer jeweils Michael Schumacher aus Deutschland) sowie GP Europa/Nürburgring, GP Ungarn/Hungaroring, GP Italien/Monza und GP USA/Indianapolis (jeweils Rubens Barrichello).
Ferrari-Pilot Michael Schumacher wurde 2002 Fahrer-Weltmeister.
Ferrari gewann die Konstrukteurs-Weltmeisterschaft.


 

© 2003 by Messe Essen GmbH

 

 

l Home l